Friday, August 17, 2012

Belting Up This Festive Season


Drive Safely during this festive season and show your tolerance and be considerate to other users on the road.


Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Certification & Registration

Certification & Registration

Before any organization undertake high risk activities in the workplace, they may be required to obtain a licence or certificate of competency, or register with the Ministry of Manpower.

Organization need to appoint authorised officers to perform electronic transactions on its behalf before they can use the e-services here.


MOM provides the following licensing and renewal services:

Factory Notification & Registration

Factory Notification

Factory owners are required to either notify or register their premises with MOM before operations begin. Factories with lower risk activities requires only a one-time notification to MOM before commencing operations. This notification is inclusive of a Risk Management (RM) Declaration with the Commissioner for WSH. read more 

Factory Registration (Group A, Group B)

Factory owners are required to either notify or register their premises with MOM before operations begin. Factories with higher-risk activities are required to register with MOM before beginning operations, subject to renewals if they fall under certain categories. read more
Need more help? Try our Factory Notification/Registration Self-assessment Tool:


Licensing for Equipment

Lifting Equipment

Lifting equipment such as cranes, lifts, hoists, and any cage or work platform used for carrying persons must be registered with the Occupational Safety and Health Division. Registration can only be conducted by an MOM Authorised Examiner  read more 

Pressure Vessels

Pressure vessels must be registered with the Occupational Safety and Health Division. They must be examined on a periodic basis by an Authorised Examiner. read more 

Licensing of Equipment Operators

Crane Contractors

Under the Factories (Operation of Cranes) Regulations, no person shall install, repair, alter or dismantle a mobile crane or tower crane unless he is an approved crane contractor in writing by the Commissioner. read more

Crane Operators

Crane operators must pass relevant courses conducted by the Accredited Training Provider (ATP) before they can be licensed to operate a crane. The licence is renewable every two years. read more

Crane Erectors

Approved crane erectors are required in the installation, alteration and dismantling of cranes. Contractors must deploy teams comprising approved crane erectors and sufficient crane assistants to set up and dismantle cranes safely. read more

Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Driver (1st Class, 2nd Class)

Individuals must be certified by MOM before they can operate an Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Driver. To qualify as a 2nd Class ICE Driver, applicant must have at least 2 years relevant working experience as ICE Driver in charge of an internal combustion engine, as well as pass an oral examination conducted by MOM. To be a 1st Class ICE Driver, applicants must have at least 18 months relevant working experience after obtaining the 2nd Class certificate.

Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Engineer (1st Grade, 2nd Grade)

To be certified as a 2nd Grade ICE Engineer, applicants must have at least 12 months relevant experience in operational charge or as an assistant in operational charge of Internal Combustion Engines. They have to attend and pass the interview by the Board of Examiners. After 12 months of obtaining his 2nd Grade ICE Engineer certificate, an individual may apply to become a 1st Grade ICE Engineer.

Steam Boiler Attendant (1st Class, 2nd Class)

Applicant must have at least 2 years relevant working experience assisting in operational charge of a steam engine/steam boiler or hold a valid equivalent Certificate of Competency (COC) issued by a recognised authority. Holders of the 2nd Class certificate may apply to become a 1st Class boiler attendant after 18 months' relevant working experience.

Steam Engineer (1st Grade, 2nd Grade)

Applicants to become a 2nd Grade Steam Engineer must have at least 12 months relevant working experience assisting in operational charge of a steam engine or steam boiler. Applicants without the Engineering Knowledge II (2nd Grade) certificate awarded by Singapore Polytechnic has to attend and pass the interview by the Board of Examiners. Steam Engineers who have 12 months' relevant working experience after obtaining their 2nd Grade certificate can apply for a 1st Grade certificate.

Licensing for Safety Professionals

Authorised Examiner (Lifting equipment)

Authorised Examiners must be Registered Professional Engineers in the relevant field with a valid Practising Certificate. They must have at least 5 years of relevant experience in the design, commissioning, operation, maintenance and inspection or any related experience in the lifting equipment applied for. They must be also familiar with the relevant codes and standards on the inspection criteria related to the lifting equipment applied for. read more

Authorised Examiner (Pressure vessel)

To be an Authorised Examiner of Pressure Vessels, applicants must be a registered Professional Engineer in the relevant field with a valid Practising Certificate issued by Professional Engineers Board, Singapore. They should have at least 5 years relevant experience in design, commissioning, operation, maintenance and inspection or any related experience of the pressure vessels applied for. Applicant must be familiar with the relevant codes and standards on the inspection criteria of the pressure vessels applied for. read more

Designated Factory Doctor

Designated factory doctors must be registered medical practitioners with the Singapore Medical Council.They must also hold relevant approved Postgraduate Occupational Health Qualifications. read more

Workplace Safety & Health Professional

Workplace Safety & Health (WSH) Professionals must hold one of the prescribed WSH-related qualifications, and have at least 2 years' relevant working experience (documentary proof from employer is required). read more

Licensing for Service Providers

Crane Contractors

Under the Factories (Operation of Cranes) Regulations, no person shall install, repair, alter or dismantle a mobile crane or tower crane unless he is an approved crane contractor in writing by the Commissioner. read more

Risk Consultant

Risk Consultants assist the company to train staff on risk assessment and guides them through risk assessment of work processes and the implementation of risk control measures. They play a critical role in ensuring that capability in risk assessment is heightened, and a risk management system is established within the company. read more

Scaffold Contractor

Only approved scaffold contractors are allowed to erect, install, re-position, altered or dismantle scaffolds (other than tower and trestle scaffolds or any scaffold with a height less than 4m). read more

Accredited Training Provider (ATP)

Training providers are required to submit course/teaching materials and examination questions/answers for accreditation by MOM. Individuals are not eligible to apply for approval to be accredited as an Accredited Training Provider (ATP). read more

Inspection Agency (Pressure vessels & Lifting equipment)

Third Party Inspection Agencies for Lifting Equipment and Pressure Vessels must be approved by MOM. read more

Workplace Safety & Health auditing organisation

Audits of safety and health management systems must be carried out in accordance to the relevant legislation and guidelines set out for each industry. To ensure that workplace safety and health audits are carried out in an acceptable manner, all approved workplace safety and health auditing organisations and auditors are required to adhere to MOM's guidelines. read more

Authorisation of eService Account Administrator and Nomination of eService user

Before using Workplace Safety & Health online eServices, an organisation needs to authorise officers to perform electronic transactions on its behalf.
Passes

eService Account Administrator

Every Workplace or Competent Organisation registered with MOM needs to authorise (only) one staff member to be an eService Account Adminstrator. The roles of an eService Account Administrator are as follows:
  1. Nominate eService User(s) for each Workplace or Competent Organisation record;
  2. Maintain eService User account(s) i.e. Update or Remove the eService User record(s). 
Staff authorised to be eService Account Administrator needs to 
  1. Use his/her SingPass to log in to either of the eServices listed below;
  2. Complete the online form;
  3. Upload the authorisation letter printed on company letterhead (icpdfsample template), indicating clearly the Personal Identification Number (ie. NRIC No. or FIN No.), full name and contact details of the nominee. 




eService User

An eService User is nominated by an organisation’s eService Account Administrator or an Authorised Examiner (who has subscribed to Workplace Safety and Health online eServices) to perform electronic transactions on its behalf. The eService Account Adminstrator or the Authorised Examiner need s to log in to the eService listed below using his SingPass, fill in the Workplace Number/Competent Organisation Reference number (if applicable) as well as contact details of the nominee.

The eService can also be used to enquire on the eService Account User(s) that have been registered to act on behalf of the organisation or the Authorised Examiner.

 

Useful Links

Monday, June 25, 2012

Managing Chemicals in the Workplace


Managing Chemicals in Workplaces

Chemicals are used extensively in workplaces. Many useful products such as paints, plastics, adhesives, detergents and pharmaceuticals are derived from chemicals. For many toxic chemicals, the health effects may take a long period of time to develop. 

Hazardous chemicals in the workplace can generally be categorised into three different types viz physical hazards (e.g. flammable, explosive, and reactive), health hazards (e.g. toxic, corrosive, narcotic, irritating and carcinogenic) and environmental hazards (e.g. aquatic toxicity and ozone depleting).

In Singapore, the more hazardous chemicals are regulated or licensed by relevant authorities. For example, the National Environment Agency (NEA) has licensing control over some 121 hazardous substances, the Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) regulates petroleum and flammable substances and the Singapore Police Force regulates the explosive precursors.

MOM administers the WSH Act and its subsidiary regulations relating to the safety, health and welfare of persons at work in workplaces. The WSH (General Provisions) Regulations has a number of provisions for protecting workers and employed persons against hazardous chemicals. These include container labelling and safety data sheets, prevention and control of airborne contaminants, regular workplace monitoring, and competent persons to take charge of hazardous chemicals.  The WSH (Medical Examinations) Regulations requires compulsory medical examinations for workers exposed to 17 prescribed toxic chemicals.

Please see the Hazardous substances listed under the WSHA 5th schedule here.

The exposure to chemicals at work may result in occupational disease over time. Please refer to occupational disease statistics here.

Chemical contact or exposure can also lead to fatalities at workplace. A chemical spill incident on 27 Feb 2009 claimed the lives of four workers who succumbed to chemical burns shortly after the incident (please see MOM Press Release and the WSH Council Press Release).

Hence, a comprehensive and effective programme for workplace using hazardous chemicals is necessary for early risk detection and intervention.

Management of Hazardous Chemicals Programme
The Management of Hazardous Chemicals Programme (MHCP) is initiated under the Workplace Health Strategy to enhance chemical management at workplace, and to prevent or control chemical hazards as well as to protect persons at work against such hazards. Its objective is to prevent occupational diseases, injuries and fatalities from hazardous chemicals.

Accidents or incidents involving hazardous chemicals can happen at any stage of the life cycle of the chemicals viz manufacturing, transportation, storage, handling, usage, and disposal if these chemicals are not properly managed.  Accidents may happen because of inadequacy of safety and supervisory measures and/or lack of information and training concerning the hazards associated with the chemicals and the processes. For instance, exposure to chemicals handled or manufactured at workplace can result in the excessive absorption of chemicals and chemical poisoning. There has been a rise in fatalities from 0 to 4 due to exposure or contact with harmful substances from 2008 to 2009 and recorded zero fatality in 2010.

Occupational diseases arising from chemical exposure in workplace over time highlight the importance of hygiene and medical monitoring as well as good management of the chemicals at workplace. A monitoring programme via medical surveillance and hygiene monitoring can help to identify high risk processes or operations. Upon identification, the company can implement control measures and monitor workers’ exposure to specific hazards.

For more information on managing hazardous chemicals in your workplace, please click HERE.

Singapore Competent Authorities on Chemical Management
There are several agencies which regulates hazardous chemicals with specific inherent properties and at different stages of their life cycle.

1. The Minisitry of Manpower regulates the exposure to chemicals at workplaces; please refer to the MOM legislation for more information.

2. The National Environment Agency (NEA) regulates hazardous substances which are highly toxic and/or generates toxic wastes. For more information about the Hazardous Substances Control programme in NEA, please refer to this link.

3. Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) regulates the storing and transportation of flammable materials including petroleum. Please refer to this link for more information about the Fire Safety Licensing and Enforcement.

4. Singapore Police Force (SPF) regulates the manufacture and storage of explosive precursors. Please click here for the list of chemical precursors regulated and the requirements to hold a license to deal with these chemicals.


Sunday, May 27, 2012

NEA Safety Audit Guidelines


NEA Safety Audit Guidelines

1 The Pollution Control Department (PCD) of the National Environment Agency licenses the import, sale, storage, transportation and use of hazardous chemicals. These chemicals are listed and controlled under the Environmental Protection and Management Act and its Regulations
.
2 Besides having stringent regulatory controls, it is equally imperative that companies have adequate and effective systems in place to ensure safe management of hazardous chemicals.
3 The Safety Audit Scheme is, therefore, to spur companies to systematically identify and rectify weaknesses in their management systems and practices of handling hazardous chemicals once every two years.
4 Companies under the Scheme can either conduct their own safety audit studies in-house or engage accredited consultants to do so on their behalf. Companies that are going to be conducting safety audits for the first time are advised to engage an NEA accredited consultant.

5 Companies shall seek prior approval from PCD should they decide to use an in-house audit team. When appointing the in-house audit team, the companies shall ensure that :
  1. the team leader should not feel inhibited from disclosing strengths and weaknesses and in the management of hazardous substances and in recommending necessary actions,
  2. the team and team leader's skills and experience are appropriate,
  3. top management submits a letter to PCD stating that it has confidence in the skills and experience of the team and team leader and that it will act on their recommendations (where practicable).
6 To ensure compliance with the recommendations, a follow-up action plan with the date of compliance shall be included in the Safety Audit Report.  Our officer will arrange with the company for an inspection upon the compliance.

7 The elements to be audited under the Scheme are in Annex 1.
8 The list of accredited consultants is in Annex 2.
9 The guideline for the safety audit report is in Annex 3.

10 A list of reference reading material is in Annex 4.
[ Note for Industries under Ministry of Manpower's Safety Management System Audit Scheme and ENV's Safety Audit Scheme. ]

Guideline on Safety Audit Annex 4



Guideline on Safety Audit Annex 4



 REFERENCE READING MATERIAL 



*Environmental Audit Handbook
Ministry of the Environment and National Council on the Environment
ICC Guide to Effective Environmental Auditing
International Chamber of Commerce (ICC)

*Environmental Auditing
United Nations Environment Programme

*Environmental Auditing
An Introduction and Practical Guide

British Library

ISO 14000 Standards
14001 - Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Specification
14004 - EMS - General
14010 - Environmental (Env) Auditing - General
14011 - Env Auditing Procedures
14012 - Env Auditors
Safety Audit for the Safe Handling of Hazardous Chemicals
ISO 14000 Guide
Complete Guide to ISO 14000
NB:
  1. * - These references are available at the Woodland Regional Library.
  2. If your company is going to conduct safety audits for the first time, it is advisable that you engage a consultant accredited by NEA.


INDUSTRIES UNDER MINISTRY OF MANPOWER'S SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AND NEA'S SAFETY AUDIT SCHEME
As of 1st Mar 2001, the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) has extended its Safety Management System (SMS) scheme to cover oil and petrochemical industries and wafer fabrication plants. As NEA's Safety Audit elements are covered under MOM's SMS scheme, there shall not be a need for industries covered under both schemes to carry out a separate safety audit for NEA subject to the following procedures:

  1. Industries engage 3rd party auditors registered with both MOM and NEA or 2nd party auditors from their companies' corporate HQs with the approval of both MOM and NEA to carry out MOM-SMS once every 2 years; and
  2. The SMS reports shall be submitted to MOM with a copy to NEA. NEA will accept MOM-SMS as NEA-SA.

Guide line on Safety Audit ANNEX 3


Guide line on Safety Audit ANNEX 3



GUIDELINES ON THE SAFETY AUDIT REPORT


 1 GENERAL
1.1 The report shall be structured as follows:
Chapt1 Executive summary
Chapt2 Introduction
Chapt3 Overview
Chapt4 Assessment
Chapt5 Findings / Recommendations
Chapt6 Certification
1.2 The report shall be bound in A4-size. 1 copy shall be submitted to PCD and 1 copy to each of the following agencies for information:
  1. National Environment Agency
    Pollution Control Department
    Chemical Control Section
    40 Scotts Road, Environment Building #12-00
    Singapore 228231
    Attn: Mr Martinn Ho
  2. Director
    Singapore Civil Defence Force
    HAZMAT Department
    91 Ubi Ave 4, S(408827)
    Attn: LTC Teong How Hwa

  3. Occupational Safety and Health Division
    18 Havelock Rd, #05-01, S(059764)
    Attn: Mr Yeong Chark Sung

2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
2.1 The audit's scope, schedule, methodology and rationale for the choice of methodology used in the audit shall be outlined.
2.2 The findings of the audit and recommendations for improving the safe management of hazardous substances in the facilities shall be outlined.
3 INTRODUCTION
3.1 General description of the company and its activities.
3.2 The audit's scope, schedule, methodology and rationale for the choice of methodology used in the audit shall be elaborated.
3.3 The audit team leader and members are to be introduced. Their qualifications and experience should be listed.
4 OVERVIEW OF USE/HANDLING OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES
4.1 This section should present a description of the storage sites, processes and operations in which hazardous substances are involved and an overview of the likely hazards present.
4.2 Maps, sketches and a list of the types/quantities of hazardous chemicals stored should be included. The list should also state each substance's UN Hazard Class, PSA DG Group and NFPA Hazard Rating, if available.
5 ASSESSMENT
5.1 This section shall present the assessment of the management of hazardous substances in the facility with respect to the prescribed eleven (11) audit elements.
6 FINDINGS/RECOMMENDATIONS
6.1 The key findings of the audit and recommendations to improve the safe management of hazardous substances in the facility shall be presented in detail along with their underlying rationale and an action plan for their implementation.
6.2 Factors that could result in a hazardous / catastrophic event, the likelihood and consequences of such an event and the control measures at the facility should be discussed.
7 CERTIFICATION
7.1 Certification by audit team leader (or consultant) and senior management that:
  1. the handling and storage of hazardous chemicals at the site comply with the provisions / sections of the EPMA,
  2. all reasonable professional skill, care and diligence had been taken in preparing the audit report and that the contents are a true representation of the facts,
  3. the site conforms generally to guidelines pertaining to the safe management of hazardous chemicals stated in the (SEMI international standards/specifications or FM loss prevention engineering guidelines or equivalent (only for wafer fabrication plants)
  4. the maintenance of fire alarm and protection systems and other fire safety works conform to the requirements stated in the NFPA, UFC or UBC codes or any code of practice established by PSB and FSB. (for sites storing and handling flammable and combustible substances)
  5. after the implementation of recommendations, the occurrence of a hazardous substance spill/release at the site, with off-site impacts, in unlikely.

_______________________
Name
Lead Auditor
Name of Safety Audit Firm
Date: _____________
  _______________________
Name
Auditor
Name of Safety Audit Firm
Date: _____________

_______________________
Name
Designation of management in charge of FM or EHS
Name of Company Audited
Date: _____________

_______________________
Name
Designation of senior management (e.g CEO, MD, GM or Plant Manager)
Name of Company Audited
Date: _____________

Safety Audit Guideline Annex 1

Safety Audit Guideline Annex 1

 

ELEMENT TO BE AUDITED UNDER THE SAFETY AUDIT SCHEME 
SAFETY POLICY
The audit shall ascertain whether the installation has a written safety policy endorsed by top management in which safe management of hazardous chemicals are adequately covered.
SAFETY INFORMATION
The audit shall ascertain whether the management of the company has set up and maintained a comprehensive set of written safety information to enable all its staff to handle and store chemicals safely. The information shall cover those items normally reflected in the material safety data sheets of the chemicals, which include identification and understanding the potential hazards of chemicals, safe working procedures and emergency actions to take in case of emergency.
SAFE WORK PRACTICES
The audit shall ascertain whether safe work procedures have been established to ensure the safe handling, including transportation, loading and unloading, storage and use of hazardous chemicals by plant employees as well as contract workers. Identification of all hazardous chemicals and their hazards used in the plant, a work authorisation system and compliance of standards and regulatory requirements should be part of the safe work procedures.
MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE
The audit shall ascertain whether the installation has developed and instituted a system including use of proper written procedures to manage changes to handling of hazardous chemicals. It shall also ascertain whether the plant staff have been informed of and adequately trained to safely manage such changes.
MAINTENANCE OF FACILITIES
The audit shall ascertain whether a maintenance system to ensure that all facilities used for the handling and storage of hazardous chemicals, including storage containers, are maintained in sound and good working order at all times.
TRAINING
The audit shall ascertain whether training provided to staff responsible for the handling and storage of hazardous chemicals is effective and that such training adequately covers the safety information and safe work practices. The training shall ensure staff are kept up to date on changes to the types and work procedures in the handling of the hazardous chemicals.
INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS
The audit shall ascertain whether the installation has established a system to investigate every incident in the workplace involving the handling and storage of hazardous chemicals, and to promptly address the investigation's findings and to implement the recommendations.
GENERAL PLANT INSPECTION/REVIEWS
The audit shall ascertain whether regular inspections and reviews on handling and storage of hazardous substances have been conducted, and procedures for reporting potential hazardous conditions and monitoring the remedial actions established.
HAZARD ANALYSIS
The audit shall check on whether the company has an established programme to carry out hazard analysis on the handling of hazardous chemicals so as to identify, assess and evaluate potential hazards, especially when new hazardous chemicals or a significant increase in the quantities of hazardous chemicals are handled. The audit shall also ascertained whether the company has an established procedure to record these hazards and develop and implement means to eliminate the hazards or reduce the hazards to an acceptable level of risk.
EMERGENCY PLANNING AND RESPONSE
The audit shall ascertain whether the on-site emergency action plan established by the installation can deal with all accidental releases and/or fires of hazardous chemicals and whether there are adequate emergency equipment stored on standby and maintained in good working order.
The audit shall also ascertain whether regular rehearsals of all or part of the emergency action plan were carried out and documented. It shall also ascertain whether the lessons learnt from these rehearsals were recorded and used during updates of the plan.
CONTRACTOR SAFETY
The audit shall ascertain whether contractors engaged to handle hazardous chemicals, including transportation, have been carefully selected, informed of their safety responsibilities and adequately trained to handle hazardous chemicals safely and to respond to emergency.
ADDITIONAL ITEMS
The audit shall ascertain if the site conforms generally to guidelines pertaining to the safe management of hazardous chemicals stated in the Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI) international standards/specifications or Factory Mutual (FM) loss prevention engineering guidelines or equivalent (only for wafer fabrication plants)
The audit shall ascertain if the maintenance of fire alarm and protection systems and other fire safety works conform to the requirements stated in the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) code or Uniform Fire Code (UFC) or Uniform Building Code (UBC) or any code of practice established by PSB and FSB. (for sites storing or handling flammable or combustible substances)

Hazardous Substances Safety Audit Guidelines


Hazardous Substances Safety Audit Guidelines


1 The Pollution Control Department (PCD) of the National Environment Agency licenses the import, sale, storage, transportation and use of hazardous chemicals. These chemicals are listed and controlled under the Environmental Protection and Management Act and its Regulations.

2 Besides having stringent regulatory controls, it is equally imperative that companies have adequate and effective systems in place to ensure safe management of hazardous chemicals.
3 The Safety Audit Scheme is, therefore, to spur companies to systematically identify and rectify weaknesses in their management systems and practices of handling hazardous chemicals once every two years.
4 Companies under the Scheme can either conduct their own safety audit studies in-house or engage accredited consultants to do so on their behalf. Companies that are going to be conducting safety audits for the first time are advised to engage an NEA accredited consultant.

5 Companies shall seek prior approval from PCD should they decide to use an in-house audit team. When appointing the in-house audit team, the companies shall ensure that :
  1. the team leader should not feel inhibited from disclosing strengths and weaknesses and in the management of hazardous substances and in recommending necessary actions,
  2. the team and team leader's skills and experience are appropriate,
  3. top management submits a letter to PCD stating that it has confidence in the skills and experience of the team and team leader and that it will act on their recommendations (where practicable).
6 To ensure compliance with the recommendations, a follow-up action plan with the date of compliance shall be included in the Safety Audit Report.  Our officer will arrange with the company for an inspection upon the compliance.

7 The elements to be audited under the Scheme are in Annex 1.
8 The list of accredited consultants is in Annex 2.
9 The guideline for the safety audit report is in Annex 3.

10 A list of reference reading material is in Annex 4.
[ Note for Industries under Ministry of Manpower's Safety Management System Audit Scheme and ENV's Safety Audit Scheme. ]

Guideline for Emergency Response Plan for the storage of Hazardous Substances

Guideline for Emergency Response Plan for the storage of Hazardous Substances

Hazardous chemicals have the potential to seriously endanger life and pollute the environment. Such chemicals have to be carefully managed at all time to prevent any accidental release. The successful implementation of a chemical safety programme requires co-operation from the industries to manage their hazardous chemicals properly and the support of the general public.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN

Notwithstanding the controls and precautions taken, one cannot rule out the possibility of spillages and accidental releases of hazardous substances during transportation. With well drawn up emergency plans and proper training, such releases can be effectively contained and the damage to the environment and dangers to the health and safety of public minimised.

As a condition for granting licences and transport approvals, companies are required to put up emergency response plans.

The plan must be comprehensive and should contain the following key elements :-
  • notification procedures; (persons and authorities to contact and how to contact)
  • emergency procedures to contain and decontaminate spills; (immediate actions to be taken by driver/ground staff and actions to be taken by the company upon being informed)
  • emergency equipment to be carried on the vehicle and at base such as personal protection equipment, absorbents, neutralising solutions and salvage drums;
  • Material Safety Data Sheets of the hazardous substances transported.
The emergency response plan (ERP) shall be vetted and approved by SCDF before a Transport Approval may be issued.

Under the provisions of The Environmental Protection and Management (Hazardous Substances) Regulations, in the event of a chemical fire / release, the licence holders\transport approval holders are required to:
  • block off the area contaminated by the hazardous substance;
  • notify SCDF and the PCD;
  • take immediate action to have the area decontaminated and return the situation to normal.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN (ERP) FOR THE STORAGE/USE OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

The key elements of the ERP are briefly as follows: 

Introduction
 
1 Introduce the activities of your company and its need for the storage/use of hazardous substances.
2 Include maps/diagrams of the site and storage areas.
3 Include the inventory of hazardous substances stored as follows:


Name of Substance UN Hazard Class PSA Dangerous Goods Class Unit Capacity of Container/Packaging Max Qty Stored at Any One Time





  
Hazard Assessment 
 
4 Describe the hazards of the substances being stored (e.g. flammable, explosive, toxic, corrosive)

5 Describe the possible spill/release scenarios involving the hazardous substances stored including a quantitative estimation of the hazard zones. The worst case scenario is to be highlighted.

 Support/Training 
 
6 List the fire protection and pollution prevention/mitigation equipment at your site.

7 Indicate the type/s of training received by your staff and/or your emergency response team.

8 Include a schedule to exercise, review and test the ERP so as to keep current and operational.

Response
 
9 Describe the specific actions that will be taken by your staff and/or your emergency response team in the event of a spill/release of hazardous substances.


For information/assistance, please consult the MSDS, your hazardous substances supplier

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Scheduling of Mandatory Training

Scheduling of Mandatory Training Program for Relevant personnel

Prior to scheduling  relevant personnel for the mandatory training program,
organization need to conduct training needs analysis first before Identifying and
planning for the mandatory WSH training for the relevant personnel because
training needs analysis is based on the logical sequence of comparing  a person's
skills level with the demands of his or her job and hence the identification of the
person actual skills shortfalls

Organization shall establish procedures to identify the training needs of managers,
supervisory staff and workers so as to provide them with comprehensive training
On in-house safety rules and regulations, statutory requirements, safe work
Practices, and other relevant occupational safety and health related training
       

Training for different personnel at various organisation level.


Training for Management Personnel

All relevant management staff should undergo safety training and be equipped
with the proper understanding of the safety management system, safety policy and
organisation, statutory requirements on safety, and their duties and responsibilities
in safety and health

The training should also provide the relevant management staff with the tools and
techniques needed for managing safety and health effectively at the workplace.                        

Training for Supervisory Personnel

All direct and contractors’ supervisory personnel should undergo the necessary
training to achieve a better understanding of the safety aspect of the work
operations to ensure tasks are carried out safely. All supervisory personnel
should also be trained in the skills and methods required to perform their tasks
competently and safely, and to lead workers in safe work practices.

Training for Workers

All new direct and contractors’ workers should undergo the organization in-house
safety orientation training programme before they are allowed to commence work.
The organization should ensure that no worker is assigned to carry out any high
risk or hazardous job unless he has been provided with the necessary training.

The safety orientation training for workers should cover the relevant safe work practices,
in-house safety rules and regulations, hazard identification in work areas and the response
emergency. Safety training programme should be conducted in languages understood by
the workers.

(4) Mandatory Training

The Factories ( Safety Training Order) Regulations
requires the workers
,supervisor and managers working in a construction sector or working in a certain
industrial premises to attend a mandatory safety training course designed for their
job.

An organization can in fact check if an employee has attended the following courses and
if they will be issued with certificates valid for two or four years (for CSOC and SSIC
only) based on their period of employment in Singapore by navigating to the MOM
website Check Worker’s Training Records

· Building Construction Supervisors Safety Course (BCSS)

· Construction Safety Orientation Course (General Trade) (CSOC)

· Shipyard Supervisors Safety Course (SSSC)

· Shipyard Safety Instruction Course (General Trade) (SSIC)
               

Maintenance of training records

Organization shall ensure that they document and maintain records of all safety
training received by all the workers. The safety training records kept should include
the date of training, topics covered in the training programmes, trainers conducting
the training and examination results of the training.

Factories ( Safety Training Order) Regulations

Factories ( Safety Training Courses) Order 2001 and the WSH ( Construction)
Regulations  2007, regulation 9,
comes into effect in June 2001 which enforced
the requirements for mandatory training for certain categories of persons employed
in the construction work site and in certain industrial  premises. This is an integral
part of the Ministry’s strategy to curb accidents through education

Under the Factories ( Safety Training Order) Regulations, it requires the following
categories of workers to attend a mandatory safety training course designed for their
job and they are:
  •  Workers level 
  • Supervisor level
  • OSH personnel    
  • Managerial level
To administer the mandatory training in WSH for the relevant personnel at the
workplace  would require the  organization to consider the need to plan for and
administer the mandatory training through the following steps
  • ·  Identification of mandatory training program

  • ·  Identify the accredited training providers

  • ·  Scheduling of mandatory training programs

  •   Maintenance of training records
Information on the Mandatory WSH training for the construction industries Vis-a-vis the
worker level, supervisor level and the manager level as well as the accredited training
providers can be gathered from the Ministry of Manpower Websites   
           
Mandatory WSH Training
         

ALL LORRY CRANE OPERATORS TO BE CERTIFIED BY SEPTEMBER 2013

ALL LORRY CRANE OPERATORS TO BE CERTIFIED BY SEPTEMBER 2013


ALL LORRY CRANE OPERATORS TO BE CERTIFIED BY SEPTEMBER 2013
New course launched by WSH Council to enhance safe operation of lorry cranes

By September 2013, all lorry crane operators will have to be certified under a new training course aimed at enhancing safe operation of cranes. This course is a new requirement under the Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) (Operation of Cranes) Regulations 20111. There are currently about 3,500 lorry cranes2 being operated island-wide and they may pose potential risks to workers and members of
the public as they operate on the roads even during peak periods for landscaping and other activities.

Lorry Crane Operator Course

The WSH Council, in consultation with the National Crane Safety Taskforce,  has developed a new course and test for lorry crane operators. The Lorry Crane  Operator Course (LCOC) is a 2½ day course designed to equip lorry crane operators  with the basic skills and competencies required for the safe operation of lorry cranes.


 Enhancements to the Regulations were previously announced by Mr Hawazi Daipi, Senior Parliamentary Secretary for Ministry of Education and Manpower at the 28th Annual Construction Safety, Health and Security Campaign, organised by Singapore Contractors Association Ltd on 19 July 2011. The Regulations that took effect in September 2011 will strengthen the safety of lifting operations by cranes by requiring the establishment and implementation of a comprehensive Lifting Plan, and training for different members of the lifting team, including the crane operator, lifting supervisor, rigger and signalman.


 Lorry Cranes are referenced in the Workplace Safety and Health (Operation of Cranes) Regulations 2011 as a lorry incorporating an articulated arm mounted on the lorry which is used for loading, unloading and lifting of materials or goods.


The WSH Council set up the National Crane Safety Taskforce in mid 2009 to review the safety of crane operations and make recommendations for industry-level mprovements. The Taskforce announced its threepronged strategy in Sept 2009 to enhance training, outreach efforts and new standards/code of practice.


Under the WSH (Operation of Cranes) Regulations, new lorry crane operators will  have to complete the LCOC and pass the assessments before he is allowed to  operate a lorry crane.


The new course will ensure that all operators are properly trained to be able to  operate lorry cranes competently and safely by September 2013. Besides training  the operators on the roles and responsibilities of a lorry crane operator, the course will also cover other key topics such as principal components of a lorry crane, how an operator can identify possible hazards, implement control measures and perform safe lifting operations.


Experienced lorry crane operators who have at least three years of experience in operating lorry cranes and can show relevant proof of his competency and/or experience will be exempted from the LCOC and allowed to take the Lorry Crane Operator Competency Test (LCOCT) directly. Those who do not pass the test will be required to enrol for the LCOC. The course is available for registration with the BCA Academy from January 2012. More details on LCOC and LCOCT can be found in Annex A.


Mr Ismadi Mohd, Deputy Director of Equipment Safety with the Ministry of  Manpower’s Occupational Safety and Health Division and a member of the Crane  Safety taskforce said, “Over the past five years, unsafe lorry crane work practices  resulted in 4 fatalities across more than 40 incidents. The Ministry’s investigations show that many of these incidents could have been prevented if lorry crane operators were better trained and adhered to proper safe work procedures while  carrying out crane operations. This shows the need to enhance the training and  competencies of our operators.”


Leading this enhancement is Mr Tan Wee Seng, Chairman of the WSH Council-led National Crane Safety Taskforce. He said, “Following extensive discussions with lorry crane stakeholders, we have found that training the operators will be pivotal to improving safety standards as they are primarily the ones in charge of the lorry cranes on-site. Crane accidents have potential risk on the lives of the public, workers and the crane operators. In order to give the industry sufficient time  to comply, lorry crane operators have nearly two years till 1 September 2013 to be  certified. However, we urge all lorry crane companies to send their operators for  training early so that they are better equipped to handle any lifting operations safely.”

Supporting this latest move is Mr Dave Ng, Honorary Auditor of the Singapore Cranes Association. Mr Ng said, “We have reviewed the ways we can enhance the safety of lorry crane operations. While we advocate the use of safe work procedures and the lifting plan, it was clear that the operators’ capability to perform the work safely was critical. Hence, the move to train the operators is the right thing to do.

Given the large numbers, it is good that we have been given almost two years to get  our operators trained.”


Lorry Crane Operator Course

Legal Requirement Under the Workplace Safety and Health Act Chapter 354A, Workplace Safety and Health (Operation of Cranes) Regulations 2011 Part 2 (General Provisions), states that:

4. No person shall operate a lorry loader unless –
he has successfully completed a training course, acceptable to the Commissioner, on the operation of a lorry loader; if required by the Commissioner, he attends re-training on the operation of a lorry loader and successfully com pletes such re-training; and
if required by the Commissioner, he produces a current medical certificate from a registered medical practitioner certifying that he is medically fit to operate a lorry loader

5. It shall be the duty of the responsible person to ensure that no person is allowed to operate a lorry loader unless the person satisfies the requirements referred to in paragraph 4.


Lorry Crane Operator Course Objectives

To meet the legislative requirements for safe use of lorry crane
To fulfill the duties and responsibilities of lifting operators
To learn about the principal components of a lorry crane
To recognise lorry crane operational hazards and implement control measures
To study about pre-lifting inspection requirements in lifting accessories
on a lorry crane
To understand more about the selection of appropriate rigging equipment
To learn how to estimate load and determine centre of gravity
To detect ground condition and proximity hazards
To learn how to set operational outrigger
To master safe loading / unloading, lifting and placing of materials
techniques using lorry crane
To learn about the factors affecting lifting capacity and interpretation of
load chart
To receive training on how to respond to lifting accidents and emergencies

Friday, May 11, 2012

Workplace Safety And Health Resources|Workplace Safety And Health Blog|: How To Get Your Certified As WSHO

Workplace Safety And Health Resources|Workplace Safety And Health Blog|: How To Get Your Certified As WSHO: With the implementation of new WSH legal framework in Singapore, more and more companies are seeking out for WSHO to help them better mana...

How To Get Your Certified As WSHO

With the implementation of new WSH legal framework in Singapore, more and more companies are seeking out for WSHO to help them better managed their workplace safety and health and this indirectly creates more jobs for the WSH Professionals

Do you have the intention to develop your career in the field of Workplace Safety Management?
And if you do, here are the progression path  for a WSH professional.


And if your ultimate goal is to get yourself certified as WSHO, here are some quick guide to help you







Workplace Safety And Health Resources|Workplace Safety And Health Blog|: Regulatory Programme

Workplace Safety And Health Resources|Workplace Safety And Health Blog|: Regulatory Programme: Asbestos Control Programme The Asbestos Control Programme aims to eliminate asbestos-related diseases over the long term through progres...

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Regulatory Programme

Asbestos Control Programme

The Asbestos Control Programme aims to eliminate asbestos-related diseases over the long term through progressive elimination of asbestos use, and the minimisation of exposure during the use and removal, and management of asbestos in buildings. Target processes include work involving removal and abatement of asbestos in buildings, vessels and other premises.
The programme involves
  • strengthening the legislative requirements for asbestos removal work
  • introducing a licensing scheme for asbestos removal contractors
  • raising awareness and capability building; engagement and enforcement
MOM works with the Building Control Authority, National Environment Agency and other relevant stakeholders in implementing the programme.

Business Under Surveillance (BUS)

The Business Under Surveillance (BUS) Programme is a systemic intervention tool to regulate poor performing companies to focus on developing and implementing a robust safety and health management system to improve their WSH performance.
This programme is divided into two phases – the Assessment and the Surveillance phase. In the Assessment phase, companies who have had fatal accidents, demonstrated poor WSH management (such as poor site conditions that result in Stop Work Orders) or have had accumulate a number of demerit points would typically be considered for entry into the BUS programme. A thorough review of the implementation of the risk assessment and the strength of the management system would be conducted. If the company fails the assessment, they will be subjected to close surveillance.
In the Surveillance phase, OSHD requires the company's management to develop and commit to a comprehensive and sustainable Action Plan. The company is held accountable to their proposed Action Plan and reports the implementation progress on a regular basis to OSHD. In addition, inspections are carried out frequently by the OSHD Surveillance Branch to verify the progress made. The company will exit from the programme upon demonstrating significant improvement in its WSH performance and management.

Cluster operations

Cluster Operations (COPS) is a workplace inspection programme where selected cluster of workplaces are pre-announced on this website before the inspections take place. This is to encourage affected companies to take the initiative to improve safety and health standards within their workplace prior to MOM's inspections. Links to online guidelines, technical advisories and compliance assistance tools will be provided to assist companies in their preparation for the workplace inspections.

In certain clusters of workplaces, upstream stakeholders of these workplaces (e.g. client of affected companies) will also be engaged to solicit improvements in workplace safety standards within the cluster.

Outcomes of the workplace inspections conducted and common contraventions detected will be shared after each operations, to facilitate companies in the detection and rectification of weak areas within their workplaces.
Upcoming Cluster Operations are published as highlights in the Workplace Safety and Health section.

Confined Space Management Programme

The Confined Space Management Programme aims to enhance confined space hazard management and prevent deaths from chemical poisoning and asphyxiation during confined space work and rescue operations. Iso-tank operations in logistics, shipbuilding and ship-repairing industries, manhole works and other workplaces with confined space hazards are required to implement a confined space management programme consisting of the following elements: hazard identification, evaluation and control, entry-permit system, atmospheric testing and monitoring, ventilation and emergency response.
Initiatives include:
  • identification of workplaces with confined space hazards
  • raising awareness and capability building for confined space management
  • implementing effective in-plant confined space programmes

Hazardous Chemical Management Programme

The Hazardous Chemical Management Programme covers chemical manufacturers and workplaces using hazardous chemicals. The objectives of the programme are to prevent and control chemical hazards and protect persons at work against such hazards.
Companies under the programme are required to implement an in-plant chemical management programme consisting of the following key elements: hazard communication (labelling and safety data sheet), training and education, hazard assessment and control (with respect to storage, handling and disposal of chemicals), personal protection equipment, workplace monitoring, medical surveillance, and emergency response.
The programme entails
  • identification, evaluation and control of chemical hazards
  • review of exposure limits
  • regular monitoring or assessment of chemical exposure
Results of regular exposure monitoring are submitted to MOM and captured in our chemical exposure database. Where exposure levels are excessive, intervention actions will be taken.

Noise Induced Deafness Prevention Programme

The NID Prevention Programme (NIDPP) aims to reduce the incidence of Noise-induced Deafness (NID). The target of this programme includes workplaces with noise hazards in the manufacturing, shipbuilding/ship-repairing and construction sector, through a series of outreach and enforcement activities. Key elements of the in-plant HCP include noise monitoring, noise control, hearing protection, audiometric examinations and health education.
Initiatives under this programme include:
  • strengthening legislative requirements
  • identifying noisy workplaces for surveillance and control
  • managing noise hazards at workplaces through the implementation of in-plant Hearing Conservation Programme (HCP)
  • raising awareness and building capability in noise hazard management

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Environmental Legislation Associated with Development of Industrial Building

Pollution Control

The Environmental Protection and Management Act (EPMA) & Regulations provide for and
regulate the installation, operation and maintenance of the industrial plant and pollution
control facilities. It also regulates the limits for emission of air impurities into atmosphere,
discharge of wastewater into watercourse and the factory boundary noise. The EPMA
requires a Clearance Certificate to be obtained before the commencement of any industrial
plant work and a Compliance Certificate to be obtained after satisfactory completion of any
industrial plant work.

Environmental Health


The Environmental Public Health Act and Regulations provides for and regulates the
installation, operation and maintenance of the solid waste management facilities in
developments.

Sewerage

The Sewerage and Drainage Act (SDA) provides for and regulates the construction,
maintenance and improvement of sewerage system. It also regulates the discharge of
sewage and trade effluent and for matters connected therewith.

The Sewerage and Drainage Act requires:
a) Clearance Certificate to be obtained before the commencement of any sewerage
and sanitary works
b) Compliance Certificate to be obtained upon satisfactory completion of any sewerage
and sanitary works
c) Approval to be obtained before carrying out any building/structure works, piling
works or temporary structure works over, across or adjacent to any sewer or
sewerage system
d) Approval to be obtained before the discharge of any trade effluent into public
sewers

Drainage

The construction, maintenance, improvement and safeguard of land drainage systems are
regulated under Sewerage and Drainage Act (SDA) and the Sewerage and Drainage (Surface
Water Drainage).

Environment Control
 
The Sewerage and Drainage Act requires:
a) Clearance Certificate to be obtained before the commencement of any storm water
drainage works, or to erect or place any structures or object in, above or across any
drain or drainage reserve
b) Compliance Certificate to be obtained upon satisfactory completion of any storm
water drainage works, erection or placement of any structures or object in, above or
across any drain or drainage reserve
c) Approval to be obtained before carrying out any temporary structure works/services
over, across or adjacent to any drain or storm water drainage system
d) Approval to be obtained before construction of any works for taking or intercepting
water from any place or sea, within the territorial limits of Singapore
Who are the parties involved?
a) Developer appoints a process consultant or Qualified Persons (QP- Registered
Architect or Professional Engineer) to prepare and submit the necessary applications
to obtain Industrial Allocation clearance, Development Control clearance, Building
Plan clearance certificates, Temporary Occupation Permit clearance and Certificate
for Statutory Completion clearance (Compliance Certificate)
b) QP shall also supervise, inspect the building works and certify completion of building
works in accordance to the environmental codes

LEGISLATION ON ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY FOR BUILDINGS


As Singapore aspires to be a leading global city in environmental sustainability, there is scope to further improve on energy efficiency requirements in buildings, to address the impact of climate change. While the focus on energy efficiency remains important, a more holistic approach was taken to encourage environmental friendliness in buildings to ensure that environmental quality and comfort are not compromised. Among other initiatives, BCA has enhanced the Building Control Act and put in place the Building Control (Environmental Sustainability) Regulations, to require a minimum environmental sustainability standard that is equivalent to the Green Mark Certified Level for new buildings and existing ones that undergo major retrofitting. This regulation took effect from 15 Apr 2008. Projects that are submitted for URA planning permission on or after 15 Apr 2008 will be subject to this requirement.
SCOPE AND DETAILS

  • All new building works with gross floor area of 2000 m2 or more ;
  • Additions or extensions to existing buildings which involve increasing gross floor area of the existing buildings by 2000 m2 or more;
  • Building works which involve major retrofitting to existing buildings with existing gross floor area of 2000 m2 or more.
Alteration to existing buildings which does not involve major retrofitting works is not subject to this requirement. 

The requirements on environmental sustainability of buildings will be integrated with the building plan process. The qualified person who submits the building plan and the other appropriate practitioners will be responsible for assessing and scoring the building works under their charge using the criteria and scoring methodology spelled out in the Code.

The minimum environmental sustainability standard will be revised with effect from 1 Dec 2010.  The compliance with the respective environmental sustainability standards will be based on the first submission date for URA planning permission as stated in the table below.

1st submission date for URA planning permission
Compliance Standard
From 15 Apr 2008 to 30 Nov 2010
Code for Environmental Sustainability for  Buildings, 1st Edition, Apr 2008 issue
From 1 Dec 2010 and onwards
Code for Environmental Sustainability for  Buildings, 2nd Edition, Aug 2010 issue

Here are the administrative details
Green Mark (GM) e-Filing System
For submission in compliance with BC (Environmental Sustainability) Regulations 2008
GM submission at BP stage
For Projects with 1st submission date to URA planning permission on or after 1st Dec 2010
Green Mark score calculations for residential buildings

Green Mark score calculations for non-residential buildings

Note : These forms are to be generated from Green Mark (GM)
e-filing system.
For Projects with 1st submission date to URA planning permission from
15 Apr 2008 to
30 Nov 2010
Green Mark score calculations for residential buildings

Green Mark score calculations for non-residential buildings

Note : These forms are to be generated from Green Mark (GM)
e-filing system.
As-built GM submission before TOP stage
For Projects with 1st submission date to URA planning permission on or after 1st Dec 2010
As-built Green Mark score calculations for residential buildings

As-built Green Mark score calculations for non-residential buildings

Note : These forms are to be generated from Green Mark (GM)
e-filing system.
For Projects with 1st submission date to URA planning permission from
15 Apr 2008 to
30 Nov 2010
As-built Green Mark score calculations for residential buildings

As-built Green Mark score calculations for non-residential buildings

Note : These forms are to be generated from Green Mark (GM)
e-filing system.
 
MANDATORY HIGHER GREEN MARK STANDARD FOR GOVERNMENT LAND SALES SITES IN SELECTED STRATEGIC AREAS
To maximise the potential for cost-effective energy savings in our built environment, it was announced in BCA’s 2nd Green Building Masterplan in 2009 that projects developed on land sold under the Government Land Sales (GLS) Programme sites in the selected strategic areas will be subject to higher Green Mark Standards.
 
SCOPE AND DETAILS
This requirement will apply to buildings works related to any building on land sold on or after 5 May 2010 under the Government Land Sales Programme in selected strategic areas. The building works subject to this requirement are to be designed to meet the prescribed Green Mark Certification as shown in the following table.
Selected Strategic Areas Exact Location to refer to the Building Control (Environmental Sustainability ) Regulations 2008 Requirements for building wholly or partly within area that is on land sold under the Government Land Sales Programme
Marina Bay Green Mark Platinum Rating
Downtown Core – including areas within the CBD located next to Marina Bay Green Mark GoldPlus Rating
Jurong Lake District Green Mark GoldPlus Rating
Kallang Riverside Green Mark GoldPlus Rating
Paya Lebar Central Green Mark GoldPlus Rating


For building works that are subject to this requirement, the qualified person and appropriate practitioners need not submit their declarations of the Green Mark scores along with the building plan submission. Instead, the qualified person should ensure that, prior to the building plan submission, an application is made to BCA for the project to be assessed certified under the certification standards approved by the Commissioner of Building Control. Upon completion of the building works, the qualified person should submit the Green Mark Certificate showing the Green Mark Certification rating achieved for the project along with his application for a temporary occupation permit (TOP) or certificate of statutory completion (CSC). It is important to note that the prescribed Green Mark Certification rating for the building has to be obtained before a TOP/ CSC can be granted.
The certification standard will be revised from 1 Dec 2010 in tandem with the changes in the Green Mark Criteria.  The compliance with the respective certification standards will be based on the tender award letter issued by URA to the successful developer under the Government Land Sales (GLS) programmes for the selected strategic areas and as stated in the table below.
Date of Tender Closed under the GLS programmes
Compliance Standard
From 5 May 2010 to 30 Nov 2010
BCA Green Mark Certification Standards for New Building, GM Version 3.0, May 2010 issue
From 1 Dec 2010 and onwards
BCA Green Mark Certification Standards for New Building, GM Version 4.0, Aug 2010 issue


Link to more info on BCA Green Mark Scheme :
http://bca.gov.sg/GreenMark/green_mark_buildings.html

Link to the application form for certification :
http://www.bca.gov.sg/GreenMark/others/Form.pdf

Clarifications
For any queries pertaining to the new requirements, please contact our officers :
Subject matter
Name
Email
Contact No.
Projects under GLS / BP Submission requirement
BP Hotline
63257159
Green Mark Related /Submission requirement

Grace Cheok
63257588
Leow Yock Keng
63255075
Green Mark e-Filing System
Polly Chiam
63255026